Category Archives: Joy

Maypoles in November

I’m a little late in getting this blog to press. The La Nina weather pattern has delayed the hot weather that normally foreshadows the entrance of summer, affecting the normal rhythms of nature that propel me to write.

The southern hemisphere summer and its associated Fire energies begin to make themselves known at the point midway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. This “cross quarter” day is November 7th. In the northern hemisphere, the equivalent date is May 5th. At least as early as the 14th century, and probably earlier, folk in northern Europe celebrated May 1st as the herald of warmer weather and the first hints of summer. The Gaelic people of Scotland and Ireland celebrated May Day as the festival of Beltane which translates to “lucky fire”, an interesting echo of the ancient Chinese view of summer as a resonance of the Fire Element.

One of the features of these May Day festivals was dancing round the Maypole. In this traditional dance, people would wrap ribbons around the pole by weaving in and out of one another in the dance. The celebrations would probably include drinking and cavorting which might lead to more intimate contact between the participants. We know that Maypoling was banned by the Puritans in 17th century England because of these “ungodly” activities, but was reinstated by Charles II, the merry monarch who was well known to enjoy all of these associated goings-on.

With the advent of modern psychology in the shape of Sigmund Freud, the Maypole acquired another symbolic reference: the phallus. Of course, Freud saw phalluses under every bush and every bed, but most historians agree that the Maypole was not one of them. Rather it was symbolic of the central point of reference of the four directions.

Here in Australia in modern times, we celebrate the arrival of summer in similar ways. It is the start of the cricket season, the annual signal that summer is here. (Coincidentally, cricket commentators refer to the stumps as poles.) Other summery events are barbeques and other outdoor parties which can stretch into the night with the later and later sunsets. It is also the start of the festival season when crowds of people get together – more socially distanced now of course, but still in groups. People begin to wear fewer clothes and show more flesh, casting some minds to closer contact.

Celebration. Fun. Dance. Playfulness. Socialising. Relationships. Sexuality. All of these are resonances of the Fire Element and ultimately of the Heart. Summer is the time when the Fire and Heart energies come to fore, like an instrument in a jazz band taking its turn to play its solo. Nature is encouraging us to pay attention to these Fire Element aspects of ourselves, that we may further flourish as humans.

I’ll be back in six weeks when we reach the zenith of the Fire Element, the summer solstice. In the meantime, go ahead, play with Fire!

Flashback to some earlier Fire blogs

Light Your Fire!

Fun Fun Fun

Doorways to Emotional Transformation

Towards the end of last year I presented a seminar in three cities, “Acupressure for the Emotions” which focused on the outer shu points of the Bladder meridian. These points are well known in the Five Element tradition for their influence on the psycho-emotional correspondences of the Elements. These same points are also used to address the spiritual level of the person being treated.

By the time I had presented the seminar for the third time, ideas began to surface for an article exploring the relationships between the emotional and spiritual aspects of human nature. Shortly afterwards, as  serendipity would have it, I was invited by the Shiastu Therapy Association of Australia to submit an article to their journal Pointers for the Autumn 2019 edition.

This article explores the connections between emotion and spirit, and posits the view that our emotions are portals to uncovering the deeper, essential aspects of our nature. Indeed,  aspects of our True Nature.

Download the full article here: Portals To Tao

Healing Trauma

Last month I wrote about the use of Acupressure for cancer patients, linking suggested points to previous articles. It was then that I realised that Bladder 43, the outer shu point of Heart Protector, did not have an article to link to. Therefore I’m reprinting the article from my book ‘The Way of the Five Elements’. This is such an important point for any condition related to the emotional heart. And as you’ll see, its uses range far and wide. You might say it is a point for being human.

Gaohuangshu – Rich for the Vitals – Bladder 43

It is the nature of being human that we are vulnerable. We inhabit fragile bodies and have delicate feelings. We are sensitive to many external stimuli from physical objects, and from what other people do and say to us. We are influenced, even if we don’t know it, by the thoughts and feelings of others. It is this vulnerability that gives us the capacity for deep contact with others and the world. But it also means that we are easily hurt.

Babies are born totally vulnerable. It is one reason they are so adorable. But soon the child develops a protective shell to shield her from the slings and arrows of life in the human realm. When these traumas of life are outrageous, egregious, and they penetrate the shell, it is the Heart Protector which absorbs the shock so as to protect the Heart. When the insults to the Heart are great, the Heart Protector is deeply injured. Therefore healing trauma requires healing the Heart Protector.

One of the best points for working with trauma of all kinds is the outer shu point of the Heart Protector, Gaohuangshu – Rich for the Vitals which lies between the shoulder blades and behind the heart.

This point exerts a strong influence over the official of the Heart Protector, especially at emotional and psychological levels. However, the point name itself refers to the Gaohuang, a region in the chest, whose influence is much wider and deeper than that of the Heart Protector alone.

The Gaohuang or Vital Region, is an area in the chest about four body inches in diameter, lying between the centre and base of the sternum, and extending laterally to the pathways of the Kidney meridian.

When there is illness that is caused by deep heartbreak, betrayal, abuse, shame, or isolation, this vital region is deeply impacted and the effects go deep into our being. Jarrett sees this as a place where deep karmic issues and conflicts reside, and where dark family secrets live. Chronic or incurable disease is said to lodge here.

Classical texts observe that Gaohuangshu deeply nourishes and calms the Heart as well as Kidney and Spleen. The action of this point was considered so great that it was said to strengthen the original Qi and treat every kind of deficiency. Sun Si-miao, the famous 7th century physician, went so far as to say that there is no disorder it cannot treat.

Gaohuangshu is a great tonic point for the physical body, treating exhaustion and general deficiency, increasing stamina and supporting all the organs. It brings warmth and strength and increases blood circulation.

At the emotional level, the point brings warmth when a person is emotionally cold and shut down. It helps to dispel depression and mental negativity. When someone has little capacity for intimacy and humour because they are too depleted or vulnerable, this point lifts the spirit.

Location of Bladder 43

Gaohuangshu, is located between the shoulder blades, 3 cun lateral to the midline, at the level of the junction of T4 and T5 and at the medial border of the scapula. It is approximately half way down the scapula. Use firm, direct pressure. To treat yourself, lie on a tennis ball or other object that presses into the point. Arrange the pressure so you can be as relaxed as possible. Having someone you trust hold this point can be very healing.