Tag Archives: xi-cleft points

Outer Mound

Gall Bladder 36 ~ Waiqiu ~ Outer Mound

Here in the Adelaide Hills spring is waiting impatiently in the wings, itching to leap into action. After our long, cold, wet winter, South Australians too are ready. Last week the maximum temperature was 11 degrees at my place. This week it’s predicted to jump to 30. That’s spring for you. Sudden growth and movement.

Last week my body told me it was spring when my gall bladder decided to complain forcefully about the chocolate brownie I ate, something I know is not good for me. The thing about spring is that its rising Wood energy puts pressure on any aspect of Wood that is out of balance, whether that is the organs of liver and gall bladder, the tendons and ligaments, the eyes, the emotion of anger or any of the other resonances of that Element.

The Gall Bladder point we are examining today is perfect for acute conditions of the gall bladder organ. Very timely for me. Once again, I am offered an opportunity to live the writing.

Gall Bladder 36 is the xi-cleft point of the channel. As we saw when we looked at Bladder 63, the xi-cleft points of the yang meridians are used for acute conditions and for pain. They are also used to address the emotion associated with the channel when the emotion has become overwhelming.

The name Outer Mound refers to the location of the point at the outside of the mound of muscle that is the calf. There are other mounds on the Gall Bladder channel in the leg: Yang Mound Spring (GB 34) and Mound of Ruins (GB 40). Outer Mound makes me think of the pitcher’s mound in baseball, a raised place which offers a good view of the batter and from where the pitcher can throw fast and direct. All of these are qualities which echo Wood’s resonances. As far as I know the ancient Chinese weren’t into baseball, but I thought I’d offer this whimsical, modern interpretation.

The point can be used to treat acute conditions of the organ of gall bladder, like the sudden spasms and nausea that can accompany a gall bladder attack. But it is best known for its effectiveness in treating pain along the channel pathway. The Gall Bladder pathway is the most complicated of all of the meridians as it zig-zags its way down the body, starting at the outside corner of the eye, crossing over the head twice and around the ears before passing through the neck and shoulders, down the sides of the ribcage, passing through the front and back of the pelvis, before straightening out down the side of the leg and ending at the fourth toe. The wandering nature of the pathway means that pain in many otherwise unrelated locations could offer a unified picture of imbalance. Of all of these places along the pathway, Gall Bladder 36 is particularly known for treating neck pain and stiffness.

Another of the point’s uses is in relaxing the sinews, the tendons and ligaments, and tissue of the Wood Element. In addition, it treats invasion of Wind, the climate resonance of Wood. Symptoms of Wind include occipital headaches and neck pain, jerky or shaky conditions such as restless legs, migratory pain, or an intense aversion to being outside in windy conditions. Gall Bladder 36 is also known for treating skin conditions and clearing toxins due to its capacity to clear heat from the body.

At the emotional level, Gall Bladder is associated with anger which can turn into judgement of others or just as easily, into anger at oneself as self-attack. A healthy Gall Bladder official is able to see the big picture clearly, make sound decisions, and move swiftly to action. Stagnation in this official often leads to lack of clarity, poor judgements, hesitation and vacillation. Waiqiu can support the clarity of mind that is needed to act wisely in the world.

If the rising energy of Spring is causing some niggling problems in your liver or gall bladder organs; if it is causing irritability or frustration, making you short-tempered and swift to judge others; or if you are having trouble making decisions and seeing clearly how to move ahead with your plans, Waiqiu can support you with clarity and ease of movement.

Location of Gall Bladder 36

The point is located on the outside of the lower leg. It is 7 cun above (superior to) the tip of the outer ankle bone, and lies at the anterior border of the fibula in the cleft between the fibula and tibia.

Begin by finding the midpoint between the knee crease and the outer ankle bone. Go down (inferior) by 1 cun (body inch) and at that level, first find the back of the fibula bone, then roll forward (anterior) until you feel the cleft between the bones.

Restoring Flow

Kidney 5 – Shuiquan – Water Spring

Our cold, wet winter continues in South Australia. And because of Covid outbreaks, our government has kindly given us a chance to explore the depth of Water more deeply by sending us into a 7-day lockdown.

Meanwhile, the recent heavy rains have left my back garden sodden, serendipitously evocative of the Kidney point we are exploring today.

Kidney 5 – Shuiquan – Water Spring is one of a loop of points from KI 3 to KI 6 that lie like a billabong behind and below the inner ankle bone. A bit like my garden at the moment. These are all important points, KI 3 the yuan-source point, KI 4 the luo-connecting point, KI 5 the xi-cleft point and KI 6 the master point of the Extraordinary Vessel Yin Qiao Mai.

As we saw in the previous post on its partner point Bladder 63, the xi-cleft points of the yin meridians are used to clear disorders of the Blood as well as to treat acute conditions of the organs.

There is close connection between the Kidneys, uterus, Blood and menstruation. Given this and the fact that the yin xi-cleft points are known for treating Blood disorders, Kidney 5 is an excellent choice for treating all menstrual problems. These include irregular or delayed menstruation, amenorrhoea (absence of menstruation) and dysmenorrhoea (painful menstruation). Shuiquan is also known for treating abdominal pain, infertility, uterine prolapse and cystitis. It does all of these things by promoting movement of Qi and Blood in the lower burner and harmonising the Conception Vessel (Ren Mai) and Penetrating Vessel (Chong Mai).

Water Spring, as the name suggests, promotes the smooth flow of water. It is therefore used for treating conditions of the urinary system including painful, frequent, difficult and dribbling urination.

Kidney 5 has the capacity to purify the nature of the Water Element. It can be considered as a secondary source point, cleansing and refurbishing the Water in a similar way to the source point’s (KI 3) function of restoring us to original Qi.

It thereby brings a fresh perspective. Water Spring restores, refreshes and brings new vigour to all levels of the body, mind and spirit.

In cases where fear and depression are both present, this point is called for. Use when a person is frozen in place, rooted to the spot, afraid to even go outdoors, can’t budge from where they are out of fear of moving forward. For people who have created a prison round themselves, this point utilises the immense power of Water to smash through the prison walls, enabling the Water to flow freely once more and allowing the person to access the full depth of their potential.

Location of Kidney 5

First locate Kidney 3 (white dot), immediately posterior to the high point of the inner ankle bone, in the deep hollow between the tibia bone and the Achilles tendon. KI 5 (blue dot) is one cun directly below (inferior to) KI 3, in a depression above (superior to) the insertion of the Achilles tendon.

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