September Equinox

Today is the September Equinox. Here in the southern hemisphere it is the Spring Equinox, the middle of our journey through the Wood Element; while in the northern hemisphere it is the Autumn Equinox within the Metal Element. For everyone all over the world, the nights and days are of equal length. The difference is that in the southern part of the globe, our days are getting longer and temperatures warmer, while for those of you in the top bit, your days are growing shorter and colder. But for one brief day, we meet in the middle. It makes me think of children on a see saw where one goes up as the other goes down, but they meet in the middle as the positions change. Today is literally a pivotal day in our passage between the Great Yin and Great Yang of the winter and summer solstices.

Lord of the Rings fans will be well aware that this is the birthday of Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, though they never grow older than their 111 and 33 when they first entered the mind of JRR Tolkein. Happy Birthday Bagginses!

In something of a departure from the usual, in this blog I am republishing my review of Lorie Dechar’s new book Kigo which had it’s publication date of September 21st. It’s a wonderful addition to the library of Five Elements books and I’m delighted to recommend it. This review was first published in Pointers, Journal of the Shiatsu Therapists Association of Australia, Spring 2020 edition.

KIGO
Exploring the Spiritual Essence of Acupuncture Points Through the Changing Seasons
LORIE DECHAR ILLUSTRATED BY LORELEI CHANG

In Kigo, Lorie Dechar gifts us her poetic vision of the spirit of Chinese medicine. Nature and spirit are ravelled through this beautiful work and Lorie is our perceptive guide through the seasons. She unfolds the Chinese characters to pluck wisdom from their embedded symbols, inspiring practitioners to draw on their own inner resources to match the majesty of the points.

The Japanese word kigo means “season word”, very appropriate to the spirit of Five Element Acupuncture. Japanese haiku poets use such words to evoke the “Ah!-ness” of things. Dechar calls on the power of the kigo to remind us of the Ah!-ness of the healing encounter and to re-enliven our spiritual connection to the points.

As Dechar points out, “This book is not meant to be a how-to manual but something more like a letter of introduction to some of my most beloved friends, a series of meditations on time and place and the mysterious healing of the soul.” This perspective sets her book apart from many others which are oriented towards the treatment of conditions. Hers is first and foremost a work of the spirit of the points.

While the book is slanted towards acupuncture, an appendix details other ways of treating the points including flower essences and essential oils. Dechar also weaves Taoist, Western Classical and Jungian archetypes into the work, and incorporates the mythology of the Taoist spirit animals.

The names of her 52 beloved friends are paramount: “In order to grasp the spirit-level meaning of the point names, I find that it is important to meditate not only their poetry but also on the wisdom contained in the graphic design and energetics of the original Chinese characters.” To this end the characters are displayed as clear graphics within the text, a riddle to be deciphered, a message in a bottle that has been waiting thousands of years to be opened.

Dechar unpacks the subtle meanings of the characters, not only of the points, but also those of the elements, organs, colours, spirits, directions and other resonances, making for an easy way into Classical Chinese for the newcomer. Standing firmly in the Five Element Acupuncture tradition, Dechar chooses points that are particular to spirit. The selections often surprise, as she includes points that might be overlooked in a more mechanical approach to treatment.

Her personal relationship to the points is evidenced by prefacing them with her own haiku, each an homage to the spirit of the point.  In fact, prose poetry is woven through the text which makes the book such a delight to read.

Dechar’s  52 “friends” are divided among the five elements. While it is impossible to find just one to reflect the richness of her tapestry, I’ve chosen an example that is appropriate to our southern spring.

Gall Bladder 24 – Sun and Moon – Ri Yue

日月

Spring equinox. Twilight.
The sun dips down behind my back
as I greet the rising moon.

The haiku provides a prologue to an exploration of the balance of yin and yang, inner and outer as they manifest both at the equinox and within ourselves. Then follows an unpicking of the characters of Ri Yue which illuminates the philosophical and spiritual implications of the Gall Bladder’s capacity for wise judgement, standing one’s ground, and the balance between extroversion and introversion, action and receptivity, speech and silence. Dechar then explores a clinical case of a woman whose hip surgery (which cut through Gall Bladder 30) leads to insights about her anxiety at the uncertainty of her plans. She takes us through the conversation of honouring both inner and outer, as if placing her hand on the door before inserting the needle that will open it.

The treatment of the points, however, is not formulaic and the structure of each varies. She offers needle techniques, treatment strategies, the use of words, touch, oils and flower essences to “open others and ourselves to these transcendent realms.”

Acupuncturists will find much to engage with in terms of needle technique and the incorporation of the whole practitioner into clinical practice. But equally practitioners of other modalities as well as patients and the interested layperson will find Kigo a fascinating tour of the seasons, the elements, and the points that are the vehicles for transforming body, psyche and spirit.

Kigo publication date 21 September 2020, Singing Dragon Press