Category Archives: Arm pain

Summer Solstice

For our northern hemisphere readers, here’s a link to the previous Winter Solstice article to make you feel hemispherically synched.

Today is the summer solstice in the southern hemisphere, the middle of summer and the point at which the year expands to its limit. It’s as if the Earth has taken a long, deep breath in and can expand no more. After today, the yin half of the year begins, and the long slow exhalation propels us towards the winter solstice in 6 months time.

Correspondingly expansive movements of the body include spreading the arms wide and opening the heart centre to give of ourselves and to receive the world. The Heart is the primary organ of the Fire Element whose summer season this is. The Heart, Emperor of our personal kingdom, beats ceaselessly for our whole life, maintaining the steady drumbeat of our personal world.

Another expansive movement is to raise the arms up and out. You often see this movement at festivals and sporting events where whole stadia of people signal their excitement by raising their arms to the heavens and shouting with joy. Showing their armpits to the world with abandon.

UTMOST SOURCE

Speaking of armpits, I want to spend some time here introducing an important acupoint which lies deep in the armpit, an area rarely exposed but kept protected by our arms at the sides. In the modern world most of us don’t raise our arms up high very often unless it’s in the shower or to reach for something on a high shelf. We rarely climb trees or hang from branches as did our primate ancestors. This point is rather secret and somewhat intimate.

The point is Jiquan Heart 1, known variously as Summit Spring, Utmost Spring and Supreme Spring. But I like Worsley’s translation of Utmost Source, because it echoes the nature of the Heart and its resident spirit the shen. Shen is our connection to utmost heaven, the heavenly light that resides within the heart of each one of us.

The Heart Qi arises from the organ of the Heart, passes through the Lung, and emerges in the armpit at Jiquan like a spring bubbling out of the ground. The Qi then travels along the inside of the arm, heading for the little finger as the Heart channel is mapped out through its 9 points.

When the Heart and its channel are open and balanced, there is connection to our True Nature which doesn’t have to do anything. The Heart’s calling is not to do but to be. In the metaphor of the Emperor, his task is simply to sit on the throne and hold the space from a place of stillness. This is a great teaching for us to emulate in our often turbulent times. Holding space, holding stillness, holding presence. Just being.

Back to the armpits, Heart 1 is a common place for Qi to become blocked. In the Wei Qi cycle of the 12 meridians, the previous point is Dabao, Spleen 21 Great Enveloping. Where a channel of one Element moves into a channel of another Element, there is a greater tendency for Qi to become blocked. These are known as Entry-Exit blocks (though the pedant in me would argue for Exit-Entry blocks). Here, where the Earth energy of Spleen moves to the Fire energy of Heart, we find the most common of the Entry-Exit blocks. These blocks are usually diagnosed on the pulse. In this case an excess Spleen pulse and a deficient Heart pulse would indicate a block. But physical and psycho-emotional symptoms can also point to the possibility of a block.

At the physical level, possible indications of this block include pain or constriction in the lateral ribcage or in the armpit, difficulty raising the shoulder, palpitations and shortness of breath. Surgery or injury to the area can also be a cause. Constriction in the flow of lymph to the lymph nodes in the armpit is another. Recently I’ve had a cluster of cases of severe lymphoedema in the legs, and I’ve found that in most of these cases there was a Spleen-Heart block.

At the psycho-emotional level, this block may stem from difficulty in allowing the nourishment of the Earth Element into the Heart. There may be sadness, anxiety, mental restlessness or disconnection from the joy of life.  It may indicate challenges with intimacy or betrayal that have closed the emotional heart. Eating disorders which stem from deep dissatisfaction with one’s life might also be indicators of this block.

If you suspect there is a block in the Qi flow at Heart 1, hold the point with sustained moderate pressure for a few minutes until you feel the subtle Qi flow and that the point is open. Also hold Spleen 21 in the side of the ribcage until you feel the open flow of the subtle energy there. Treat both sides

In Qi Gong practice and in some meditation practices, practitioners are advised to stand or sit with enough space in the armpit to ‘hold an egg’. This allows free flow of Qi through the armpit and along the Heart meridian of the arm. We can take note of this and avoid long periods of holding the arms tightly to the sides.

Jiquan is a spirit point that connects our consciousness to the universal consciousness; it aligns our personal heart with the heart of the universe; and it promotes emotional warmth and connection to others through the Heart. In this season of celebration and family gatherings, it’s good to keep our hearts open.

Point of the Shoulder

Last weekend I finished teaching a Level 1 Acupressure class which includes a highly effective neck and shoulder treatment. A point not included in that treatment is a point on the corner of the shoulder which students would do well to include when treating the shoulder.

Jianyu ~ Shoulder Bone ~ Large Intestine 15

6.13The scapula or shoulder blade is a bone that is attached to the rest of the skeleton by one small joint at the point of the shoulder. This is the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. Since this is the only place at which the scapula articulates with the skeleton, a great deal of stress can be placed on this joint.

Otherwise the scapula is held in place by the 17 muscles that attach to it, connecting it to the arm, chest, ribs, spine and neck in various ways. Given that we all have unique ways of holding and moving our upper body, the positioning of the scapula shows incredibly wide variations among people.

The acu-point that is very close to the AC joint is Jianyu – Shoulder Bone on the Large Intestine meridian. John Cross (2006) calls this the shoulder chakra, a minor chakra or energy vortex that influences the whole of the shoulder region. It is a powerful point for congestion in the shoulder, since most shoulder problems affect this place where the shoulder meets the arm.

Peter Deadman (2007) hails it as the preeminent point for treating the shoulder, for it treats paralysis of the arm, shoulder and hand, atrophy of the arm and upper body, arthritis and bursitis of the shoulder, and the chronic condition known as frozen shoulder. It benefits when there is an inability to raise the arm to the head, or to turn the head. Overall it promotes the circulation of Qi and blood throughout the upper arm.

What makes this such a potent point is that, like another important shoulder point SI 10, LI 15 is a meeting point with the Extraordinary Vessel Yang Qiao Mai (Yang Motility Vessel) whose trajectory includes the sides of the body from ankle to shoulder, as well as the neck, face and head. Because of this, Jianyu releases energy to the brain, provides mental clarity, and is good for mental exhaustion and headaches. It works well in conjunction with BL 62 which is the master point of the Yang Motility Vessel.

The point also treats windstroke and clears heat, thereby relieving skin rashes including hives (for which it is best combined with LI 4 and LI 11) and for treating toothache and hypertension. It can control sweating, including underarm perspiration. And it is available as a first aid point for concussion, shock and electric shock.

In short, Jianyu helps the shoulder to let go, which reminds us that letting go is one of the functions of the Large Intestine official. Most shoulder tension arises not simply from usage, but from solidified emotional patterns. We hold ourselves in ways that somatically replicate our inner state. Letting go in the shoulder involves letting go of the emotions, ideas and beliefs that dictate our posture and which are no longer of value in our lives.

Location of Large Intestine 15

6.14

 

If you bend your elbow and raise your arm to shoulder height, two hollows appear at the point of the shoulder. LI 15 lies is the anterior (front) hollow. Once located, lower the arm and apply moderate, direct pressure.

 

This is an extract from my first book ‘The Way of the Five Elements’ which focuses on acupoints as a vehicle for healing. My second book ‘The Way of the Five Seasons’ explores many other ways we can heal through the Five Element model. Both books, published by Singing Dragon Press, are available now.

For signed copies at A$40 + postage, contact me directly.

Book Depository is a good place to buy online.

Twobooks

 

Steady As She Goes

The recent heatwave in South Australia has left no doubt that summer is here. To kick off the season of Fire points, I’ve chosen one that, among its many functions, helps those who struggle with the heat.

Neiguan – Inner Frontier Gate – Heart Protector 6

Ship's captainNeiguan – Inner Frontier Gate is a significant point on the Heart Protector meridian and one of the most important of all the acu-points. Its hallmark is its capacity to bring steadiness to the bodymind. It steadies the heart, the circulation, the stomach, the mind and the emotions.

To begin with, Neiguan is one of the strongest points influencing the chest and the chest cavity. It is the luo-connecting point of the Heart Protector, connecting to its partner the Triple Heater. But this connection with the Triple Heater is not at the forearm where the point is located but in the chest. This point therefore exerts a profound influence over the Heart and Lungs and promotes the circulation of Qi and Blood in all three Burners.

Neiguan is also the master point of the Yin Wei Mai (Yin Linking Vessel) which connects all yin meridians and influences the chest and Heart. It treats chest pain, pain in the ribs, palpitations, arrhythmia and hypertension. It relaxes the coronary arteries and is known to have a general analgesic effect.

As an important Fire point, it regulates the Fire Element, balancing it whether it is raging out of control or burning too low. It is particularly known for heat conditions such as fevers, hot skin, cracked tongue and painful urination.

At the emotional level, the point has a steadying influence on the Heart, calming the spirit, clearing the brain, and brightening the mental outlook when joylessness has pervaded the Heart Protector. It treats a wide range of emotional disorders such as irritability, anxiety, depression, mania, fear, fright and sadness. By steadying the Heart and the shen, it treats insomnia.

As the name implies, Inner Frontier Gate integrates the inner and outer. It regulates the connection between the Heart and the outer world, facilitating communication between the two. The Heart Protector protects the Heart by closing when appropriate in hurtful situations and opening to connect emotionally in loving relationships. Nowhere is this function seen more clearly than at Inner Frontier Gate. When healthy, it is a gate that swings easily on its hinges.

Where there has been pain, shock, betrayal and trauma to the Heart, Neiguan has the capacity to heal old wounds. A person suffering post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) continually re-experiences the initial trauma, whether from physical accident, frightening situations, or physical or sexual abuse. All of these traumas are absorbed by the Heart Protector and can be treated at this point.

The other major area in which Neiguan’s steadying influence is felt, is the stomach. It is a significant point for the Stomach and the go-to point for nausea and vomiting due to its connection with the Triple Heater and the Lower Burner. The point steadies the Stomach by treating all kinds of nausea including seasickness or other motion sickness, morning sickness in pregnancy and nausea experienced during chemotherapy. Its effectiveness for nausea has been well documented as there have been more scientific studies of Neiguan than any other acu-point.

When you find that your heart, mind or stomach are all at sea, try holding Neiguan to steady your ship.

4.6

 

Location of Heart Protector 6

 

The point lies on the front of the forearm between the ulna and radius bones, 2 cun (approximately 3 fingers width) above the inner wrist crease. Use moderate, direct pressure.

 

 

 

 

Cover

This is an extract from John’s book ‘The Way of the Five Elements’ published by Singing Dragon Press and now available from discerning booksellers.

For a copy signed by the author, contact john@acupressure.com.au